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calmrolfe 5 ( +1 | -1 )
The next World Champion ? I hope that it is Adams..........cos I can spell Adams !!
wellhairedbeast 6 ( +1 | -1 )
Yeah me too, ive been supporting Adams through the tournament :)
mbeep 9 ( +1 | -1 )
It seems like... he wont win though cause he lost the first rapid game as white :(

/Magnus
bucklehead 22 ( +1 | -1 )
Whether this person is "world champion" or not... ...remains to be seen. But it appears that we must all learn how to spell and pronounce Kasimdzhanov, as Rustam has just drawn the second of the rapid tiebreaks in Tripoli. This gives him a 4.5-3.5 lead in the match and (unless I am mistaken) the win.
soikins 19 ( +1 | -1 )
yap Kasimdzhanov is the FIDE World Champion. At least noone can say that he had a weak opposition in the tournament. He had to play all the top candidates for the title. But will anyone pay to see match between Kasimdzhanov and Kasparov?
peppe_l 43 ( +1 | -1 )
Congrats To Kasim - he earned his title by beating several strong opponents, even if FIDE system is far from perfect. I cheer for him vs Kasparov, even though I know his chances are not so good. Kramnik beat Kasparov, Leko won in Dortmund, Kasim won FIDE title. Kaspy got his place in semi-finals by resting on his laurels and using his reputation to get there without playing a single game, let alone winning a match.
ollie8080 8 ( +1 | -1 )
Kasimdzhanov is easy to pronounce once you know the trick - the "dzhanov" is silent ;)
calmrolfe 32 ( +1 | -1 )
I wonder ? I wonder if we have seen the emergence of a new tactic for this type of format.
Rustam rattled off the first twenty moves of all his games instantly, not even
pausing to think for a second, thereby garnering a massive initial time
advantage. Maybe other players will cotton on to this idea ?
calmrolfe 32 ( +1 | -1 )
I wonder ? I wonder if we have seen the emergence of a new tactic for this type of format.
Rustam rattled off the first twenty moves of all his games instantly, not even
pausing to think for a second, thereby garnering a massive initial time
advantage. Maybe other players will cotton on to this idea ?
soikins 37 ( +1 | -1 )
calmrolfe As the time control tends to get shorter, the importance of opening preparation grows. On has no time to think on which is a better variation, it all has to be done at home. The search for the "best" move takes too much time, therefore it is enough to find a good move. This tactic is not new, it is well known and seems Kasimdzhanov was will prepared for this time control.
bucklehead 58 ( +1 | -1 )
Yes, but the other side of that... ...is that Kasim, in his celebratory interview, suggests he adopted a less studious approach to his preparations. He said, "I only prepared for the first round against Alejandro Ramirez. It was very hard work for me since I had to work very hard to catch up with opening theory during the tournament. I took each decision round by round and I decided to play lines I had rarely played before since all my opponents were very well prepared." (wcclibya2004.com/main.asp?id=529)
fmgaijin 123 ( +1 | -1 )
Re GM Approach to G/30, G/25, G/15, etc. When I played in the BiContinental Rapid back in 1990, qualifying for a World Championship in Mazatlan that was never held, many of the top players adopted the tactic of playing the opening very rapidly, not worrying about obtaining an advantage, and then counting on the opponent to either run out of time or blunder playing the endgame (an area where top GM's and other professionals always tend to excel and generally need less time to calculate than we mortals). For example, GM Barua just swapped pieces as Black against me until we reached a Q + B vs. Q + N ending with symmetical pawns (I had the B) which he then prolonged until I (5 minutes behind on the clock ever since the opening) cracked and dropped a P and soon the ending. The other top players in the event who were capable of quick play (Anand, Wang Zi Li, Antonio, etc.) used the same tactic effectively in many games, even against other high-rated players. Thus, in the FIDE "World Championship" event, slower GM's have to win in the "classic" part of the match since some of their opponents are content to draw their way through those games and then use the afore-mentioned technique to gain the advantage in the quickplay.